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Article published August 17, 2013

Delayed, denied

GG Louis Gomori
Butler

Let it be known there is insurance fraud and it is surprising as to whom is involved. I was rear-ended on April 1, 2011, while parked at an Arby’s drive-thru, turned in the seat, getting my bank card out to pay for my order. I got out to check the car and a woman wound her window down a few inches and said “I didn’t do any damage.” I said, “How do you know? You are still in the car.”
The woman got her order, drove past me and left; luckily, I got her license plate number. The police went to her house for information.
I didn’t feel any pain until later that night, and I went to the emergency room the next day for a checkup. The neurologists I went to next spotted a C2 fracture the emergency room missed.
It got to where my auto insurance company stated I had $10,000 coverage for medical care and medications. I later learned I am entitled to a maximum medical benefit of $50,000 per year and $1,000,000 lifetime aggregate of reasonable and necessary expenses only for medical treatment and rehabilitative services
My HMO is required to cover my medical bills and medication and I am to pay a co-pay. My premium payment to this HMO is $251 a month. I am unable to get my proper medication as I do not have $987 a month for 120 pills. But I am paying for this accident, and I was parked.
The other driver’s insurance company sent me a form to fill out and mail. The form was Medicare Chapter 111: does this mean the taxpayers will be footing the expenses of this accident that are rightfully the insurance company’s obligation?



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