The Cranberry Eagle
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Article published April 8, 2013

SV teacher's painting to commemorate event



A Seneca Valley teacher has created a special painting to commemorate this year's Bantam Jeep Heritage Festival.

Jason Woolslare, a Cranberry Township resident and art teacher at the intermediate high school, created the print to help celebrate the annual event.
A commemorative print has been created each year since the festival's inaugural year in 2011. This year the print includes three Jeeps on a hill along with old newspaper headlines and advertisements.
The festival will be June 14-16 in Butler and at Cooper's Lake Campground in Worth Township.
According to a news release from the Butler County Tourism and Convention Bureau, Woolslare's art “tells a visual story of patriotism, service and respect for what has come before, while creating a unique, visual piece.”
Woolslare said he was happy to create the art for the Jeep festival.
“I tried to create a composition that the viewer would have to see multiple times, and hopefully find new images each time they viewed it,” he said.
“I also wanted to give the Jeeps some human characteristics of a Jeep family, with the father looking down the hill at the younger Jeeps who are climbing up to show respect to the father of all Jeeps.”
Patti Jo Lambert, the director and organizer of the festival for the tourism bureau, hopes the art will appeal to Jeep owners and that it will help get people excited for this year's festival.
“We hope Jeep enthusiasts and historians will add this piece to their collections and support our efforts to execute another successful festival,” she said.
Signed and numbered prints at $104 each are available at the festival's website at www.bantamjeepfestival.com.
They also are available at Plumberry Gifts in Cranberry Township, Whitey's General Store in Zelienople, Porter House Brew Shop in Portersville and Mimi's Memories, Antiques and Gifts in Saxonburg.
The prints also will be available at the Butler County Historical Society in Butler.